thisbrighton.co.uk - Brighton: illustrated   (中文)

History: A Spa by the Sea

Gotta Read It...

The Great Storm of 1987 full story...

Doing the Undercliff Walk full story...

Take Three Piers full story...

An abc of Web Design go there...

The Digital Canvas go there...

Garden Wildlife full story...

Tom Russell Hits Town full story...

 

Dr Richard Russell

A Cure by Sea Water

By the first decades of the eighteenth century Brighton was a fishing town is steep decline. Changes in the fishing industry and in the market for fish, the serious erosion of the shingle beach which was the centre of fishing operations, and the erosion of the low cliff on the top of which the town was sited all affected the viability of the town's economy and contributed to an increase in poverty and unemployment.

A Machine for Sea Bathing

Dr Richard Russell from Lewes came to the rescue of the town when he set up what today would be called a health clinic. He built a house right on the seafront on the site roughly where A New Invention: Bathing Machinesthe Royal Albion hotel stands today. Those seeking a cure for illness had for many centuries visited the inland spas to drink the waters. Russell treated his patients with seawater - both drinking it and bathing in it. Swimming was not a skill much known to the eighteenth century and hence a bathing machine was invented (possibly in Scarborough) to enable the patient to undergo the treatment. The bathing machine took care of safety and it also catered for notions of modesty and decorum.

Where's the Sand? Read a critical review of the beach, written in 1841- click here

 

The Patronage of a Royal Prince

Prince Regent, George IVWhen the Prince Regent discovered Brighton and gave it his seal of approval the town's success as a 'watering place', was henceforth secured - though recently a local historian has taken the view that Brighton was succeeding as a new 'pleasure resort' before the Prince's arrival and probably would have continued to be successful without his patronage.

However, there's no doubting that today the Royal Pavilion is the centre piece of the city's heritage industry - or is it Brighon Pier?!

 

A full account of the rise of Brighton as a tourist resort will follow asap.

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